San Pedro unveils NAACP square to honor the civil rights organization

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along with Los Angeles Mayor Karen Bass unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of Americas oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along with other public officials unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along with other public officials unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along Dr. Cheyenne Bryant, the President of the San Pedro/Wilmington NAACP Branch unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of Americas oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along with other public officials unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along Dr. Cheyenne Bryant, the President of the San Pedro/Wilmington NAACP Branch unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of Americas oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along with other public officials unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along with other public officials unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along with other public officials unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

Los Angeles City Council member Tim McOsker along with other public officials unveiled the intersection of West 3rd Street and South Mesa Street in San Pedro as NAACP SQUARE in honor of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. (Photo by contributing photographer Chuck Bennett)

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The San Pedro community celebrated the unveiling of a newly designated NAACP Square at the corner of third and Mesa streets on Saturday, Feb. 11, in honor of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization.

The square dedication was unanimously approved by the Los Angeles City Council on Nov. 22.

“We must celebrate and recognize the contributions of the African American community throughout the 15h Council District,” Los Angeles Councilmember Tim McOsker said in a statement ahead of the unveiling — even “beyond Black History Month.”

McOsker was joined by Cheyenne Bryant, president of the San Pedro/Wilmington NAACP Branch 1069, in honoring the national association’s 114th anniversary. The square is in front of Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist Church, the home church of Joe Gatling, founder of the local NAACP branch.

The NAACP was formed in New York City by Black and White activists in 1909 in response to ongoing violence against Black Americans around the country. The organization works to protect the rights of people of color and to eliminate racial prejudice.

Currently, there are more than 2,220 branches across the nation and more than 2 million members.

“The importance of representation in a marginalized community is the foundation of change,” Bryant said in a written statement ahead of the unveiling. “Community is about acknowledgement, respect and celebration of all races and cultures.”

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